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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. scattered throughout american history. >> have presidents invoked religion in their addresses, always? >> every president has invoked god or a deity in general, but not very specifically. none has actually mentioned jesus christ, four have invoked christianity. also uneven. >> has religion become more or less important over time in inaugural addresses? >> looking into the subject, i'm surprise s surprised to see the turning point came with fdr. first to have an invocation and benediction, the first to go to church on inauguration day. those things tradition nous are only as old as the 1930s and '40s. of t >> the significance of president obama using you dr. king's bible cannot be downplayed. >> we have seen the tradition with abraham lincoln and martin luther king. you think of dr. king's phrase, the moral arc of the universe is long but it dips toward justice. i think president obama is trying to to be part of that arc. >> thank you very much. good stuff, ed ayers. as i said, could i sit here around talk to you all day. thank you. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> president barack o
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiting was very appropriate. first with his relationship with dictatorship in mexico, feeling that we should go in and intervene wilson said no, this is watch and wait. once the war started, world war i, that was
was a graduate of princeton prewar and during the war. buckley says yale is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and the heritage of most elite academia in america and also they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they are too keynesian and quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that, but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen and buckley and his brother-in-law rent facelle's 1954 book in which they say yeah mccarthy has been a little too rough. he has made some errors in judgment but that causes really, really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher, that's exactly where russian is in 1954 and 55 and 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of a conservative movement before buckley founded the "national review" in 1955 that it was sort of, it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whittaker chambers had another way to describe it. he said it was people popping out like rabbits. y
. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even shaped their individual personalities. so slavery was central to southern life. but slavery was also an institution, a form of property that contained a problem, a problem for the masters. this valuable form of property was capable of thinking, capable of yearning for freedom and capable of acting upon that yearning. joshua spieled, a kentucky friend owner who was a friend of abraham lincoln's, put it this way: slave property is unlike any other. it is the only property in the world that has locomotion with a mind to control it. and he went on to say that's why they were so sensitive about any outside interference with it. slave property was valuable, but control over it seemed tenuous. and the masters' fear about that fact left them convinced that their laborers could be kept controlled and work profitably only if they were kept uneducated, uninformed, isolated from dangerous influences, closely watched, intimidated and convinced that or tear status as -- that their status as slaves was permanent and up changeable. unchangeable. to
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
is looking at all options right now with respect to what type of religions they choose. the -- what type of regulations they choose. i think the polling you showed bears it out. my reporting suggests it's probably the most likely one to be dropped ultimately in the end but they'll probably make some sort of push at the beginning. the key thing is they want to do universal background checks and thinks it's common sensoe refor any who buys a gun should be cleared and generally nra members are in approval of that and don't want nut bags to get guns. and make it's easier for law enforcement officials to track down illegal possession of guns and right now there's not a law to prevent gun trafficking. they want it on the books. they want common sense stuff and reach a little beyond that and let the crazies basically argue it's not smart and then the politics plays out the way they wan want. >> joe, you tweet and i re-tweeted the cover of "the daily news" and it's getting a good conversation. let's talk about the ni "huffington post" series, the road forward. president obama's second term chall
going on where people who had taken on certain religions were not voting. i saw the felonies that people wanted to change in the community. as far as supporting him in those areas of his new agenda, you have to understand that he had four years to clean up america and he has done a wonderful job. he pulled together a campaign and put diversity all over. we have to stop looking at presidential issues and look at what is at hand. we need to stop hiding behind a wall and congress should helpless do that, not fair to the people, the children that were killed. who is going to work? who is going to take on the new america if there are no people to take it on? thank you for allowing me to have my opinion. i truly feel that american citizens that lived and died for us, thank you to them for allowing us to have this conversation. >> the eugene robinson -- host: the eugene robinson piece this morning, "no longer the black president." "the verdict of his presidency will depend on what he accomplishes in his second term." host: that is the piece from eugene robinson, "no longer the black president."
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from new jersey for the excellent work that he continues to do year in and year out on this issue. i appreciate his leadership and we do stand today and mark the 40th anniversary of the tragic roe v. wade decision and it really is said that not all life is created equal. and since the supreme court gave our government's approval if you will of on-demand abortion, there have been over 55 million lives lo
the barriers that separated those of different race and region and religion, and where there had been mistrust, built unity, with a respect for diversity, that we had found productive work for those able to perform it, that we had strengthened the american family, which is the basis of our society, that we had ensured respect for the law and equal treatment under the law, for the weak and the powerful, for the rich and the poor, and that we had enabled our people to be proud of their own government once again. i would hope that the nations of the world might say that we had built a lasting peace, based not on weapons of war but on international policies which reflect our own most precious values. these are not just my goals -- and they will not be my accomplishments, but the affirmation of our nation's continuing moral strength and our belief in an undiminished, ever-expanding american dream. thank you very much. >> here's for from the list of inauguration we found from the academy. polk was in 1845. buchanan inauguration was the first known to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugura
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)